Businesses usually invest in a POS system that is scaled for small companies when they first get started. As they grow, their needs change and evolve, as do those of their customers.

Make no mistake – POS companies know what a hassle it is for you to switch providers. You may imagine the switch to a new provider as a disaster if you’ve been working with the same one ever since you started your company.

Here are 5 signs that you need to change your system despite your concerns.

1. You can’t trust the vendor

Not all vendors can be trusted. Make sure you do searches on them regularly to see if they’re upholding the great reputation they had when you chose them. You don’t want to choose, spend time and money to install, and waste time training staff on any old system just because of misguided loyalty.

Ideally, your vendor of choice should have a proven track record. If they’re not offering support and updates anymore, it’s time to discontinue your cooperation.

2. Your system isn’t paying off

A new POS system is a big commitment, and good ones are particularly costly. Is it paying off? There are several aspects to take into account when analyzing the impact of the new technology on your bottom line, including:

  • Loyalty
  • Time spent in staff training
  • Time wasted in data alignment 
  • Reduced waste

Does the new system include inventory management tools? You can save a lot of money by using what you have efficiently.

A system that doesn’t support loyalty program implementation or let you send registered customers targeted campaigns and offers can’t help you increase repeat visits. Not only that – it will put off existing customers as well.

POS-Ssyet

3. Your system is slow and unreliable

Good business is all about quality and speed. Nobody has any time for a slow or unresponsive Point of Sale system that delays the service. Ask for following questions:

  • Can it easily accept different types of payments?
  • Is the interface intuitive, and can it be customized to each staff member’s role?
  • What’s the average time per transaction?
  • What features does it have that help speed up the service?
  • What happens if the internet connection goes down? Will I have to take orders on paper sheets or will I still be able to take orders and process sales?

4. Your POS Doesn’t Perform Inventory Transfer

You need a POS that can track the movement of inventory between locations if you’ve grown to the point of needing multiple locations and warehouses to store your products.

The main reason for this is avoiding any complications, such as making a customer to wait longer than planned because stock wasn’t moved in a timely manner or overselling a product because it appears in multiple locations.

This is especially true in a bar enviroment. check this guide

With a POS system that’s a keeper, inventory transfers are managed in two ways:

A transfer order command can remove an item from your inventory altogether during a transfer, which can be an easy way to prevent any complications, or put an item on hold until it can be transferred, so that you cannot oversell.

The system makes warehouse transfers after an order is saved in the system. The receiving process includes warehouse transfer, so that the product location is tracked during the process.

With both inventory transfer options, you can create invoice waybills directly from the transfer, document signatures, and copy existing transfers to repeat frequent moves.

5. Its User Rights are Limited

Every organization is made up of individuals on different levels who will be using a POS in different ways.

For example, managing associates could use it to order new stock and keep an eye on inventory. Salespeople will use the system to enter customer orders and create invoices.

The higher up in the company you go, the more uses of the POS change. On the very highest level, the POS might be used by corporate executives to gather customer data, for example.

Does your POS system allow for multiple user groups? If your company is growing and this isn’t the case, it is time to move on.

A system without different feature access causes confusion, where everyone can access everything. A reliable system allows your company to set up multiple user groups and decide which features each group can access and use.

The use of specific features within the POS is termed “user rights”. It should be possible to modify what rights every group has.

Each group can access the POS system itself, which is something that all or the majority of staff members will need; the back office, the API (something that perhaps only your IT department needs), and any other apps you might need.

Deciding to Make a Change

When you have realized that you need to change your POS system, what should you do?

Switching to a new system may be a giant leap, but the new efficiency and options it brings to your business could be exactly what you require to keep scaling your growth. What you should be looking for includes:

  • A POS system with a pricing structure that works for you.
  • All the features listed above that you need for your business.
  • Compatibility with the hardware you already have
  • Data migration support

Make sure the new provider will import your data into the new system, so that it’s easier to transition.

As for hardware compatibility, this might not apply if you are looking for a complete upgrade.

Most hardware, like barcode scanners, will be compatible with most POS systems, but you may need to consider what system you switch to if you have any specialty equipment.

Other features you may look for, depending on the needs of your business, might be a POS that doesn’t require frequent software updates that interrupt your business, one that allows you better integration between your online and offline business services, and a POS system that offers great customer support for you.

About the author

Rahul Setia

Rahul Setia as Digital Marketing Head works for Contentmart.com. As an Digital Head, he enjoys building marketing strategies, delivering into website data analysis, and writing content., On twitter @rahulsetia007 and Facebook.

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