On Facebook:Brands’ Organic Reach Down, Paid Reach Up

I am sure many people has suddenly seen huge drop in their business fan page organic reach on Facebook, This happens just because facebook engineers has made some changes in their Organic post reach algorithm.

Many people are reporting for the same on Facebook community help forum :

I have a facebook page with over 1.3 million fans. My posts were regularly getting 10,000 reach or more….the post reach dropped suddenly and very clearly. Now my typical posts gets less than 500 reach each, or down about 90%. Nothing has changed and all my fans were obtained via Facebook Ads that I spent thousands of dollars on. This is extremely frustrating.

Facebook shares this announcement on their official blog too, Have a look below :

We are continually working to improve News Feed and from time to time we make updates to the algorithm that determines which stories appear first. We’ve heard from our users and Page owners that we need to do a better job of communicating these updates. Starting today, we’re going to try and change that. News Feed FYI blog posts, beginning with this one, will highlight major updates to News Feed and explain the thinking behind them.
The goal of News Feed is to deliver the right content to the right people at the right time so they don’t miss the stories that are important to them. Ideally, we want News Feed to show all the posts people want to see in the order they want to read them.
This is no small technical feat: every time someone visits News Feed there are on average 1,5001potential stories from friends, people they follow and Pages for them to see, and most people don’t have enough time to see them all. These stories include everything from wedding photos posted by a best friend, to an acquaintance checking in to a restaurant.
With so many stories, there is a good chance people would miss something they wanted to see if we displayed a continuous, unranked stream of information. Our ranking isn’t perfect, but in our tests, when we stop ranking and instead show posts in chronological order, the number of stories people read and the likes and comments they make decrease.
So how does News Feed know which of those 1,500 stories to show? By letting people decide who and what to connect with, and by listening to feedback. When a user likes something, that tells News Feed that they want to see more of it; when they hide something, that tells News Feed to display less of that content in the future. This allows us to prioritize an average of 300 stories out of these 1,500 stories to show each day.
The News Feed algorithm responds to signals from you, including, for example:
  1. How often you interact with the friend, Page, or public figure (like an actor or journalist) who posted
  2. The number of likes, shares and comments a post receives from the world at large and from your friends in particular
  3. How much you have interacted with this type of post in the past
  4. Whether or not you and other people across Facebook are hiding or reporting a given post

Facebook-Organic-reach-techblogcorner

  • In a recent test with a small number of users, this change resulted in a 5% increase in the number of likes, comments and shares on the organic stories people saw from friends and an 8% increase in likes, comments and shares on the organic stories they saw from Pages
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  • Previously, people read 57% of the stories in their News Feeds, on average. They did not scroll far enough to see the other 43%. When the unread stories were resurfaced, the fraction of stories read increased to 70%.
The data suggests that this update does a better job of showing people the stories they want to see, even if they missed them the first time. For Page owners, this means their most popular organic Page posts have a higher chance of being shown to more people, even if they’re more than a few hours old. Advertisers should note, however, that this change does not impact how paid content appears in News Feeds.
The change will not apply to all of a brands’ posts, just the less creative ones that fit certain criteria, like pushing people to buy a product, install an app or enter a contest or sweepstakes. Also under fire: posts that are just repurposed ads.
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